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2016 November

Nationalism vs. Globalism, not Globalization vs. Isolation – Trends Magazine

I don’t have the subscription to this anymore but this context frames the debate well, IMHO

“To understand this, consider their underlying values and assumptions:1

  • For multicultural globalists, national boundaries are increasingly perceived as being obsolete and perhaps even immoral. According to this emerging progressive orthodoxy, national identities are meaningless.  What counts are subnational identities like race, gender, and orientation, as well as supranational “citizenship of the world.”  Progressive pundits and journalists increasingly speak a dialect of globalism.  And they imply that it is unjust to discriminate in favor of one’s fellow nationals against citizens of foreign countries.
  • Nationalists, on the other hand, value patriotism, borders, language, and culture as defined by the nation-state. In Europe, the concept is ethnically specific; that is, it’s important whether you’re Dutch, Spanish, German, French, Swiss, or English.  In the United States, nationalism is more reflective of a desire to return to a mass consensus about what it means to be American, much as it existed in the 1950s.

These differences in assumptions lead to stark differences in public policy choices. The globalist platform includes:2

  • Open borders
  • Unfettered consumerism
  • Feminism
  • Secularism
  • Global solutions for local problems
  • Ceding national sovereignty to multinational institutions
  • Centralization
  • Collectivization
  • An unarmed populace
  • Encouragement of multiculturalism, diversity, and egalitarianism

For globally-minded progressives, the mere well-being of American workers is not a good enough reason to oppose immigration or trade liberalization…”

http://audiotech.com/trends-magazine/nationalism-vs-globalism-not-globalization-vs-isolation/

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It has appeared IMHO, that globalization fit with the second tier memes, and to me, it’s becoming clear, globalization, in its current form, is only framed out of 1st tier values–FS-GREEN being the remaining part of the globalization 1st tier puzzle.

It’s VERY INTERESTING TO ME, having said that…according to SGD, GT-YELLOW is a hierarchically more complex form of AN-BEIGE, which would be a form of “survival” at the global level (perhaps), but it’s hard to relate that to the current haves-havenots polarization emerging from the exiting first tier puzzle.

I don’t believe GT-YELLOW would “produce” the inherent conflict that is emergent from the evolution of the problems in the completion of first tier, but it’s interesting to see what’s taking place.

mike

 

5 replies on “Nationalism vs. Globalism, not Globalization vs. Isolation – Trends Magazine”

I just realized that the fundamental reason why this is largely true:

“For globally-minded progressives, the mere well-being of American workers is not a good enough reason to oppose immigration or trade liberalization…”

…and that is the assumption about “working hard and getting ahead” overshadowing hard-wired motivation to everything from the “BIG 5” to capability.

We are having a world-wide reconciliation emerge around homosexuality because it is becoming accepted as “born-in” through genetics, but we are still far from things like “not wanting to work hard to get ahead” whatever that means although I hear this consistently being drummed by the democrats and libertarians.

Reiss noted there were 6 paths to the realization of happiness and success and the Declaration of Independence (?) noted the “pursuit of happiness.

If work is only one path then what about the other 5 paths?

At present, our society doesn’t promote or support–at least with most, the assumptions that working hard to get ahead, as well as NOT working hard to get ahead are both genetically-guided.

Mike said…

we are still far from things like “not wanting to work hard to get ahead” whatever that means although I hear this consistently being drummed by the democrats and libertarians.

Mike are you implying that Republicans are more likely to be less judgemental regarding people “not wanting to work hard and get ahead”?

What does work hard to get ahead really mean – I’ve not heard this. Not wanting to work hard? Or not caring to “get ahead”? Or wanting to get ahead without working hard? I do think the younger generation, at least the 5 teens in my house, are not that interested in working hard. Well, with one exception, which is the one in college. She has to work hard, but she’s not interested in a job in addition to school, so not sure how to count that.

Heidi Mehltretter

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